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dc.contributor.authorMolina López, Jorge
dc.contributor.authorLeiva García, Beatriz
dc.contributor.authorPlanells, Elena
dc.contributor.authorPlanells, Paloma
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-24T13:20:08Z
dc.date.available2022-01-24T13:20:08Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationMolina-López, J... [et al.] (2021). Food selectivity, nutritional inadequacies, and mealtime behavioral problems in children with autism spectrum disorder compared to neurotypical children. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 1– 12. [https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.23631]
dc.identifier.issn0276-3478
dc.identifier.issn1098-108X (electrónico)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10272/20447
dc.description.abstractObjective: To evaluate body composition, nutritional status through food selectivity and degree of inadequate intake, and mealtime behavior in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to neurotypical children. Method: A cross-sectional case–control study was carried out in 144 children (N = 55 with ASD; N = 91 with neurotypical children) between 6 and 18 years of age. Body composition, nutritional intake, food consumption frequency (FFQ), and mealtime behavior were evaluated. Results: Results showed a greater presence of children with a low weight (18.4% ASD vs. 3.20% comparison group) and obesity (16.3% ASD vs. 8.6% comparison group) in the ASD group for body mass index (BMI) categories (p = .003; number needed to take [NNT] = 8.07). The presence of obesity in ASD children compared to the comparison group was even higher when considering the fat component (47.5% ASD vs. 19.4% comparison group, p = .002; NNT = 10.3). ASD children had greater intake inadequacy (50% ASD vs. 22% comparison group, p = .014; NNT = 3.58), high food selectivity by FFQ (60.6% ASD vs. 37.9% comparison group, p < .037; NNT = 4.41), and more eating problems (food rejection, limited variety, disruptive behavior), compared to neurotypical children (p = .001). Conclusion: Children with ASD showed an unbalanced body composition toward both underweight and obesity, a greater degree of inadequate intake, high food selectivity as indicated by their consumption frequency, and more disturbed eating behavior than children with neurotypical development. We suggest monitoring nutritional inadequacies and implementing nutritional strategies to expand the variety of foods children with ASD consume.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThe present study was supported in part by grants from the Mutua Madrileña Research Foundation. The authors gratefully acknowledge the study participants and their legal representatives for their partici pation in the study. Funding for open access charge: Universidad de Huelva / CBUAes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherWileyes_ES
dc.relation.isversionofPublisher’s version
dc.rightsAtribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 España*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/*
dc.subject.otherAnthropometric parameterses_ES
dc.subject.otherAutism spectrum disorderes_ES
dc.subject.otherFood selectivityes_ES
dc.subject.otherMealtime behaviores_ES
dc.subject.otherNutrient intakees_ES
dc.titleFood selectivity, nutritional inadequacies, and mealtime behavioral problems in children with autism spectrum disorder compared to neurotypical childrenes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/eat.23631
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.subject.unesco32 Ciencias Médicases_ES


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